What I do as creative Director and Media Makeup Artist

The terms creative director and media makeup artist get thrown around as a buzzword with makeup artists but very few actually understand whats involved, its not a bad thing but it is detrimental to your business if you cannot do what you are advertising.

As creative director I do a wide range of things especially when it comes to working on film projects, mainly when I do low budget work do I try and do this to add dimension and potential marketing/pr avenues that might otherwise be missed. I have to be aware of how the story from behind the scenes and the commercial side is going to look when we release the details, it has to be consistent across media.

climbing the stairs to success

Thanks in part to my work for magazines, I am able to talk directly to brands and provide what I term primary sources of pr. I write articles and then pitch the possibility of adding the brand to a Non-exclusive product placement and will negotiate with the brand and/or the film company over where and how this can be done.

My job becomes about placement and brand support what I do is work out ways to augment and support my department with product placement and designing the elements of the characters and IF required finding solutions to problems, this can include finding something that will help the budget or add to the overall story, finding myself often online checking out options to reduce the budgets. As key makeup artist you need experience to be able to carry the can, you are as much a part of the process as the rest of the team.

As media makeup artist I work within the parameters that I know I can offer, I sell the service I am skilled and experienced in and make it clear to clients what those limits are. This can include social media, product placement within the film and of course designing the makeup with the application being done and maintained on the shoot. Commercial should be your aim when working in film and TV.

Working as a beauty and lifestyle editor has given me distinct advantages that I have built up and added to my own arsenal of professional skills that can be utilised in my work, that is the difference. For me its not a buzzword its a reality of my work. A career and vocation are totally different, there are alot of steps to be taken to get to the point of being key on film and TV or even working at a magazine, build your business sensibly.

Reaching for the Stars and how its Done

When you are working as a makeup artist, especially someone aspiring to work in film and TV. There needs to be a degree of give and take in the process. Experience will get you through and into better projects over the course of time. Understanding how business works, especially the film business, can mean the difference between securing the gig and being replaced.

Reaching for the stars

Stories leak all the time about people securing gigs on a lie, by that I mean telling the production team they can do something and then failing to provide the service offered.

When it comes to reaching for the stars sometimes you need to build a ladder to get there.

Remember networking is a must and being an assistant is not something to be sniffed at. You can gain a huge amount by assisting a senior artist.

For me its all about knowing my skill set and market audience. My journey is slightly different and I do have plans, goals and aspirations that may not suit everyone and thats OK, but heres a general sense of how to move up the ladder and earn your craft.

  • When you first graduate, remember you won’t get into large scale projects immediately you will need to build your CV and show that you are willing to put the time into getting there.

  • Nothing happens overnight. Contact artists be open to assisting and listen to them.

  • Don’t listen to rumours. Just because the person teaching you doesn’t like another artist does not mean that their opinion is accurate. No platforming someone based on rumours will end badly for you.

  • Low budget is not necessarily a bad thing. Every job should have a contract, talk to the people behind the film and be open to the options.

*From a recent chat with a director, “we contacted several artists before we spoke to you and the responses were weird. Two didn’t answer, one wished us good luck but wouldn’t work for free. She didn’t ask if we had a budget what the pay scale was she just dismissed it.”

When you work for a company you can be there anywhere up to a month (I have even see it be two or three) before you get paid, so why do you think that immediately dropping an offer is smart, ask questions and negotiate.

Know your own limits, if you can’t do it, don’t sell it.

Start small and build, a website is a must. You can tie it to your social media and other accounts and use it as a marketing tool that will benefit you long term.

Above all else, be open to the possibilities and treat it like the business you claim it is.

Setting up a Schedule of Articles

taking notes

I decided to take the time to write enough articles that for two weeks possibly three, I will just need to do the social media shares and get the products and films out there.

The logic behind this is that will allow me the space to book a studio or find a really good location to shoot some additional pieces for the websites, the even better part of this is that Finally we will be sitting down this coming week to put together the details for projects we have had on the back burner for a while now.

Something that really appeals to me about this process is that aside from gaining the space to breathe, I can arrange additional videos of me working and create the work again to my own terms. With the amount of brand support I have had in the last few months and the continued development of The Lost Project into the upcoming Lost Films (a new website will be built for this).

On the topic of websites, this will be a good time to do the additions that have been in the back of my mind for a long time to get done. Bringing in some of the brands that we have already worked with and giving them another boost through our network.

A big worry for my bank manager, will be the cost but in my experience you have to invest in your business to draw the clients you want.

The Realities of Beauty Writing and being a Makeup Artist

When it comes to being a beauty editor or a beauty writer there is a sense of ease that is taken for granted in the process. People will undermine the work and treat it like a whimsical process that relies on words like confection and decadence to support its own validity.

Beauty writing

This also leads to people undermining the work and in some cases using the piece as their own platform to boost their own (ego) or business. Without giving any thought or credit to the person writing. Removing the platform that they use to promote themselves and demanding fair treatment when they refuse to do the same.

Invalidating someone else’s work has become somewhat commonplace, the notion that anyone in the same field as you, even in the broadest sense, is competition and ergo should be removed from the marketplace is a sad and frankly an unnecessary action.

As a beauty editor and writer my days can be spent on the computer writing, researching or arranging meetings. On odd occasions I have been known to shoot my own work, although that in and of itself is becoming rare as the platform seems to be wasted when bookings are going to fresher talent “to give them a chance” with the expectation that I promote them and/or a project that I have spent time designing for is no longer mine it has been given to someone else to “allow their business to grow.” After all I am established and known so its OK to use my network to promote someone else.

Now I am not saying that I won’t support but I also will not accept that all work must be done with freshers, that is ridiculous and negates years of training and hard work.

It has become common to Demand and demean the work to a point where I have had to tell clients I am no longer willing to work with or give voice to certain people and brands because of the sheer arrogance and egotism of their behaviour toward me and my work.

Being a beauty editor or a makeup artist has a degree of diplomacy involved and lately that has become a difficult skill to offer at least thats what I am told when I refuse to cow tow to demands that are both unreasonable and outright nasty.

It is taken for granted that money is not the objective of the work when dealing with outside parties (usually I am asked to work free because reasons) and then asked to pay for copies of said images/film.

As a beauty writer/editor and makeup artist, I have had to change my terms of service to accommodate a glut of badly managed artists who feel entitled to press.

If you are approaching the table come with some degree of humility, come with a plan and be open to negotiations otherwise you will not make it past hello.

The Next Big Investment into the JamesC Business

For those unfamiliar with my career after 20 years as a makeup artist I decided to expand on the work I was doing and create for myself as well as work on other peoples projects.

I try my best to give a platform to filmmakers, designers and brands but decided to wherever possible, to shoot the content for my articles myself to save a lot of hassle. That is not to say I will not push someone else’s work but as I have had to repeat frequently of late, this is at my discretion and as much as I want to showcase everyone, it doesn’t always hit the mark or is not appropriate so I try to do the work on my own terms.

Progressively I have been adding to my kit and will soon be making the leap and adding a mirrorless camera to my working stock. The reasoning for this is simple:

  • Smaller footprint in my overall kit (which is paired down to suit gigs).

  • Practicalities of discretion when shooting on set.

  • Cost.

zoom lens

This has been the major deciding factor in all honesty as mirrorless can be cheaper and the lenses I require along with the body will be cost effective for me in comparison to the DSLR equivalents of each part.

An additional factor to this will be that it will give me a greater degree of creative control over what is and isn’t shown in terms of my work and I will be able to factor this into my work and contracts easily and for lower budget projects (if my terms are met) will also mean additional support in PR for later sales etc.

I know this seems unfair and possibly removing a platform from someone else on a video shoot and again with designers and brands become an additional cost they need to allow for but I have noticed a change in dynamic in how my work is shared and re-platformed, often lacking the credit, I felt that it was within my own interests as a business to make this choice.

Makeup artists frequently complain about not being credited in promotions or advertising and this removes that step and ensures (wherever) possible and plausible, that I can control the work. Sad to say but a necessity of late.

Admittedly I see this as a positive step forward and an expansion of what has become a very commercially and media driven business model, though not suitable for every artist it certainly works for me.

Opening the Door to Better Business

There is a huge amount of changes that people are fighting to be made in the Scottish (and global) industry. People are talking about creating groups and teams that can “regenerate” the industry, especially that of fashion.

a light bulb moment

What concerns me about this is the lack of real identity to it or the background checks that should be done to prevent collapse. In an age where its incredibly easy to verify someones background through something as simple as Facebook, which many companies are now doing, I find it interesting and have fell for it myself on the surface, people still lie about their CV.

Now if you want to question the validity of my travels, my work and my business you are more than welcome because I can provide evidence that will verify it for you.

So thats simple then.

If you are dealing with people who talk endlessly about what they have done and where they have been and there work is not close the standard you would expect here’s the thing you can cross check and ask for verification.

Overselling a skill is not smart and shows a lack of thought into your business. If you want to improve your work and get into better realms EARN your craft, if you do not have the skill earn them don’t lie about them and think you won’t get caught.

To open the door to better business you just need to earn it, that will take time, marketing and earned skill nothing comes overnight.

A Light at the End of the Tunnel

Having spoken at length to my own contacts and business affiliates over certain projects, there is now it seems to be a light at the end of the tunnel where business concerns lay. We have been discussing a few different options concerning projects.

a light at the end of the tunnel

We do have some small pieces that we plan to use, scripts are already done, that will be shot and edited with the intention of showcasing both our talents and the brands that have provided PR packages and giving something back to these companies as a thank you in form of promotion.

An additional aspect we are going to look at is the behind the scenes element (which is integrated into my own terms of employment on projects), we will be shooting for designers and creating both editorial content and video that will then be used to showcase all the talent working.

Creatively there is a point at which I felt that it was time to move in a new direction and add to my skill set and with plans to redevelop my own business.

The logic for this is that I wanted to expand and hold more control over the dynamic of my work, after 20 years in the makeup and hair arena feels like the right move.

Setting your Professional Agenda as a Makeup Artist

When you are starting out in business or redeveloping your work you need to identify your basics and work out your professional agenda and goals for your business. What this means is figuring out the Realistic goals and aspirations you are aiming at.

For fashion and film and TV this can be a totally different ball game and requires serous planning as does any business. There is always a trade off that has to be taken when you choose to specialise or redefine your business to accommodate a different style of work.

Setting a professional agenda

Looking at Film and TV, with a level of commercial production into this which includes ads and projects aimed at sales, we need to look closely at the skill set and package you bring to the table for the project and what room you have to negotiate the price structure you will work to and your overall professional agenda.

The first element of this is your own skills and experience you bring to the table. If you have zero experience or less than 5 years in a mixed background including the time in training. You can work the odds in your favour but this requires some basic pieces that need to be Negotiated in contracts and also a level of investment on your part.

As most business works on a three tier system (I have addressed this in previous blogs) you ultimately want to hit the middle market which in the UK is web TV and digital download. Personally I prefer paid work and will negotiate a minimum term agreement for my services that will benefit all parties:

  • Behind the scenes stills and video

  • Practical application of the service looking at what can and can’t be achieved on the budget from a makeup perspective as a media/commercial makeup artist.

  • Minimum rate agreed at a set level per day/week with an option of royalties on sales.

  • A contract with terms and conditions laid out with the above stipulations.

If they cannot provide or meet all the terms provided then they have to negotiate a deal that all sides are happy with. As a makeup artist (or any crew member) you have overheads and need to remember that.

As agendas go mines is fairly simple. I want to earn a living off of a skill set I have earned over the course of my career and have reached a point where I am not as willing to work for the art and regardless of your status and experience you should be saying the same.

Having an agenda for your career is not a negative thing and shows that you are treating your business as a business and not the latest in a series of trendy hobbies.

Seeking Validation and Support is not Moving you Forward

I have been getting more and more hard line over how and what support I will offer, especially now when I am finding increasingly that I am having to step back from gigs for familial reasons.

Usually in the space of a phone call and a few minutes checking social media posts I can get a pretty good handle on what you are looking for and what your expectations are, allowing me to make a choice about the end goals of the process.

makeup

Patterns I see frequently are:

  1. “I am studying makeup at college and looking for models for…….”

  2. “How can I get into film and TV?”

  3. “how can I get into fashion I really want to do shows like LFW.” Missing details in this can often be IF you pay me for my time even though I have no experience.

  4. “If anyone has a project they need an assistant for I am free and looking to gain some experience.”

Breaking these down what I see is the pattern:

  1. Students rarely if ever (myself included to some degree when I was training) do their research and the work is often craft based and more suited to a social media account than a film set or show.

  2. With google and the unlimited access to the internet via a mobile its by far easier now than its ever been to find media access centres and meetups, so why are you not doing research first? Simple, its easier to get it done for you than do it yourself.

  3. LFW and any other shows rarely pay the staff instead the head of department gets a sponsor. fashion shows SELL ad space and there is a bit of give and take involved, you need to be showing your business skills and approach sponsors with a plan. If you want to do it free then yes you will get the work but frankly you are better pulling a team and working it as head of department or as part of a brand supported placement.

  4. Although people on paper are wiling and able to be an assistant, when you tell them what is required they get upset “how will the client know what I can do if I am just assisting?” This is an attempt to secure a client and those who do assist spend their time networking and not actually doing the work required as they are trying to secure clients for themselves via undercutting and socialising, I would rather work solo and get the work done than have an “assistant” who is there to boost their own agenda over getting the work done.

Instead of seeking validation and adding that *implied heavy sigh that no one is giving you a chance, go out and create the opportunities, find them with some research or just take some time and learn about the business instead of asking for a leg up.

Redefining the Boundaries

Having just made a call to one of my business contacts in India, we are both reading from the same page when it comes to our business. Unless we have a HUGE amount of money to spend on PR and marketing (which at the moment I don’t) we are not going to get the gigs we deserve or have worked to get because we cannot campaign or PAY for the role.

Redefining the Boundaries

Another major disappointment is the fact I am spending a great deal of my time working for other people and not really getting the return on what is ostensibly an investment of time.

What does this mean for the future of JamesC and by extension The Lost project.

First off there will be a continuation of support for my current slate of clients and brands, but this will be done via email. This will allow us to be a little more flexible about the extent of work I do however I won’t be travelling out of my own pocket to events etc, I will be taking on sponsors or charging a stipend for my time and I no longer feel that there is a gain for me.

Another element that will be looked at is Location. At the moment Scotland is just not working for me and I do have offers that could potentially see me leave long term but given my age and concerns about my pension (if I am working at 70 its because I want to not because I have to), will be a primary concern.

Film is going to be made the main concern for the future and again, there will be terms and conditions laid out in advance the first and most important is to be payment.

In the next month I will be working to redevelop my marketing strategies, redevelop my portfolio and put the emphasis BACK on my own business and not that of others to the same degree.

I am sad to be thinking like this but from a realistic stand point I have to focus on my family and my business first and foremost.

Creating a Buzz

When it comes to promoting a business on a micro to zero budget, which many of us have to or find simpler depending on their targets.  We need to stop thinking in terms of creating a buzz and effective use of images and other aspects of social structure.  

creating a buzz

Taking into consideration as a makeup artist, I am asked to do events which are particularly problematic when it comes to advertising and often support.  

What I do is TALK to the client and set up a strategic plan that will benefit us both, this often is done on a zero budget and requires a little effort on my part and theirs.  The first thing that needs to be agreed is a contract and written terms for advertising my involvement in the event and of course a business overview for the company/event so that I can approach companies for sponsorship either for my segment as an individual or for the shows entire makeup department. 

Fashion events can be a huge potential avenue for support and marketing that can be lucrative (see MAC covering a variety of events and projects).  

Treating each event as a potential marketing avenue for a brand I have to then sit down and create the look, talk to the brand and show a comprehensive plan of action to promote the company that will be beneficial and drive traffic to their sites and generates sales. 

Asking for brand support is a huge undertaking and requires a lot more than just a few selfies and flyer.  

Making effective use of free social media platforms can be a huge part of this and has to be taken into account with the effective use of hashtags and search terms, a minimal investment of time can make the difference between a successful event and a failure.  

Creating a buzz for free is entirely possible and can be done with a carefully constructed plan, the method of "if we make it they shall come," does not work in the long term.  

Setting Up New Shoots

It feels like an eternity since I have been out to shoot new work and now I am pulling together another shoot with two fantastic new agency models.  

Beach shoot

Starting out with the fantastic shoot at the weekend with Stef (an amazing Italian photographer), all based around the simple beauty of headshot work, to now working with the same two models to create something a little more editorial. 

Of course, I will be doing some brand integration, this time it will be jewellery from Gentlemen's Chuckaboo and more from EX1 cosmetics and my new favourite Lola Cosmetics.  

Set on the beach, at the request of the models who wanted something different, this will be a relaxed shoot with a twist of the tribal and editorial that both Anna and Steven wanted to add to their portfolio's. 

Something that will be heavily integrated into this will be makethemake brushes and as a trial run, I will add kitstars to the mix to see how they perform.  Insider tip, they are fantastic brushes so I am not worried.  

A New Avenue

Yesterday was fun, I had a meeting with a lovely young photographer in Glasgow who wanted to talk to me directly about working together and finding a middle ground about costs, style and she wanted to discuss doing a test shot or trade test to see how we worked together.  

There is something refreshing about that I really appreciate.  

lens

What it does it opens up the debate about how we work and treat professionals who approach us. There seems to be a discrepancy in the discussion process that requires a little adjustment if people are to progress.  

One of the problems I am seeing and hearing is people want the work handed to them without any kind of effort.  I take no issue in doing a trade test for someone new if (as in this case) we can agree on terms: 

  • Test shoots should be test shoots and not a commercial venture where only one or two people are earning.  
  • Phone calls and meeting for a coffee to talk business is a necessity, your first impression truly does matter.    
  • Come to the meeting with clear goals and a sense of what you can and can't do, this is not the time to decide that a week/month/year/two years of training and minimal experience is the deciding factor on your getting the gig.  It's not.  
  • Don't sell a skillset you do not have.  if the person you are meeting is smart they will have done their due diligence and checked you out.  *It should be noted that this was done yesterday and the lovely young lady I met DID check my work, my websites, and social media and stated it happily whilst listening to my offer.  

The fantastic part of my meeting yesterday was the fact that we both had a clear idea of what we wanted and found a middle ground that worked, I did not demand nor did she, a package that would benefit only one person. 

The outcome of this was simple: a trade test with two agency models (minimum) one male and one female so she can see how I do men's grooming work and a piece on her new business using the images will be written as a form of advertorial and video footage will be created to augment this for PR on ALL sides.  Which means that I can do some product placement for the shoot which is excellent and will be a nice bonus for the whole team.  

As a professional artist, I am also a business and meeting someone who wants to create and run a business with skills and not cost being the deciding factor on hiring is refreshing. 

Russia Modest Fashion Week

It is always gratifying when a major player in the fashion world contacts me and asks for my support be it PR terms or as a consultant.  Which is why I was extremely flattered when I was contacted by the team from Russia Modest Fashion Week.

Something I am really keen to do is bring talent to the foreground and put the focus heavily on the designers and artists.  

There is something immensely gratifying about being recognised for my work and dedication to the creative arts.  Over the next few weeks I will be revealing more details about the event and of course one of my favourite London Shows: House of iKons London with Lady K media.   

Naturally I am going to still be working with the team from Scotland internaiton fashion festival who have been amazing about the show and are hugely supportive and working closely with a variety of designers and brands.  

Do What You Love

The concept of "do what you love and you will never work a day in your life" really is something I hold close.  I have been tireless in our process and really putting time and effort into the areas of business we want. 

Writing editorial content has become a massive part of how I progress and it has allowed me to do a great deal more and brought us to the attention of some amazing brands that have gone from being clients to friends. 

Overall I am happy that I have been able to give back as much as I have received and showcased some fantastic small and large companies.    

I will be bringing new elements including press release pieces and of course fresh images and updates to the magazine realm. 

 

Addressing the Standards

Yet again I am torn by the path and direction I can take, or as  I have called it before choosing a door. In line with my deal with the lost project and talks that have been ongoing with a director friend, I have a horror series and a more tongue in cheek option about psychics. 

choosing a door

There is also the aspect of where to live and work.  

Talking to some of the "industry" people I know in Scotland there is a real confounding attitude that comes to the table when we talk.  I tend to focus on the professional aspects of a job and how it will move my business forward, talking about brand placement and on those rare occasions the "the need for a dedicated studio space" over my preference regional studios.  

The overwhelming response I get is I put too much emphasis on the standard of professionalism based on what I have experienced working in different countries: 

Scotland isn't at the level you expect it to be in professional standards and that is your problem." 

I find that sentiment a little sad and worrying, do I, or anyone else for that matter, have the right to call themselves a professional when based here or is it entirely outwith the remit to expect it when the people I am dealing with call themselves professionals? 

Has professional become a buzzword?  does being a business owner only applies when it suits the moment and can be dropped in favour of "well it's not my fault I wasn't taught proper business practices so how would I know?" 

Do we have that option depending on our location?  If its a passion project does that negate the need to understand the business side of what we do? 

The film industry is a prime example of this I have found, "we shall make it and they shall come," is not a method I like or prefer but its OK because its a passion project rather than (horror of horrors) a commercial venture. 

I put a commercial value on my skills and take a great deal of pride in what I do, does that mean I am in the wrong or that I need to look further afield for the professional clarity I am searching for?  OK, I admit that I am debating relocating but as one actress pointed out (ironically she has produced several projects and never approached me for support), I should not need to leave to find the work.  So why am I being sidelined for having professional standards and the justification is always the same, "you have set the bar too high." 

This comes to play with people in other locations and I have had to tell one of my actors that not everyone looks at the art and skill of acting as a business and will focus on their friends work and not at the commercial viability of the project or what will support the story, its just the nature of dealing with people who choose to do a project for their own vanity.  

Perhaps with the plan to do my own projects alongside the Lost project, the bar I have set will become the rod that beats me.  Only time will tell.  

Changing the dynamic

Something that you will notice is the change to the front cover of the site, taking it from just makeup artist to commercial makeup artist.  What this means is that I focus my energy and time on the TV and film sector with a sideline in advertorial and writing for magazines.  

take notes

The reasoning behind this is to come in line with the clients that I currently attract and want to maintain.  Its specific marketing and advertising targeting and changing the way we approach the business and work we do. 

What this means is the focus will be on advertising and more corporate based projects.  Already putting the necessary pieces in place to do this we are working on the background elements and changing the fundamental aspects such as search engine optimization and of course the site content to focus that energy into the areas I prefer working in. 

This is not to say that I will refuse clients from the private sector.  Far from it, I love working with private clients but keeping the demographic clear and the portfolio in line with the work is the target for the next few months. 

As I stated previously in my blog,  75% of my current clientele is overseas or outside of Scotland in places like London and I will be putting the time, energy and resources into that side of my marketing. 

With an evolving business sometimes that needs change and this is what is being done with the JamesC Commercial makeup artist title change.

 

Explaining the JamesC business

I saw a very interesting post by a Scottish makeup artist on Instagram breaking down the elements of her business and why she charges what she does and it rang a bell with me.  

JamesC redefining the work

When people look at my business they make the mistake in thinking its all about the glamour and the articles that go out or the social media side of the work I do. What you don't see is the massive amount of time I spend on the other elements of my work.  

For the moment I have just had to hold off on my plans to shoot new website content for the simple lack of time, around 75% of my work is on the consultation side and I provide a variety of different aspects to that including: 

  •  Artist representation and PR
  • Brand management services including PR and articles
  • Editorial and Advertorial services

This means I can be doing anything from providing makeup services to shooting the images as a part of the package.  A lot of my time is spent focusing on taking brands and writing for them.  Another aspect that is often overlooked or ignored is the promotion of indie brands such as makeup lines or film and TV projects.  My social media and SEO skills have had to improve drastically since I joined the Trend Prive Magazine team. 

What will be changing is how this is approached since the majority of my client base is in London and across South Asia I am giving serious consideration to moving to somewhere warmer that will be an easier commute or at least lower my cost of living.  

What will be changing over the next few months is how business is undertaken and moved forward and what services will be offered: 

PR and marketing will increase and shoots will be controlled and managed by myself and the team from the Lost project.  

Shoots will be built around my own skill set and makeup and photos WILL be a JamesC endeavor.

  • Assistants will be assistants and credited as such.  Consideration will go into taking on long-term team members.  
  • Contracts and release forms will be required for each new job. 
  • 75-80% of the shoots will be shot in London or outside of the UK.  Simply for the ease of work.  

This not to say I don't want to work in Scotland but I will not be pursuing it as heavily as in previous years.  Not because this is a bad place but because I am not interested in weddings and occasions makeup and want to focus on advertising, commercial and film/TV.  Simply because I can I will also do editorial and PAY for the placement of my work in good magazines or look at the prospect of creating my own alongside the Film and TV projects we as a team are planning.  

JamesC will also be looking at bringing in a brush line as well as doing more behind the scenes work to show how the brand works.  

  

Give Face Cosmetics

It's not often that I add a new brand to my website when I do you know that there is something special about it.  Give face cosmetics ticked all the boxes and more for me and I had to add them to the roster of trusted brands.

Aside from the fun aspect, who doesn't enjoy playing with makeup?  Johnny aka Dirty Denise the lovely owner and founder of the brand is just a wonderful human being is out to help and support with a charitable trust receiving a donation for each special edition glitter that is sold, plus a passion for makeup that is both affordable and professional.  

For those experimenting with looks, learning about makeup, working on a budget I give you the amazing vegan brand Give Face Cosmetic; affordable professional makeup with a conscious and a heart.   

I will be covering the range again soon for trend prive, this time focusing on the brushes, till then you can enjoy the piece on the fantastic makeup line: https://trendprivemagazine.com/2018/07/09/give-face-cosmetics/

For more information go check out the website (and if you're a pro you can apply for a discount too so its a big plus all round).

 http://www.givefacecosmetics.co.uk

Restructuring the work

In line with the work of The Lost Project, I decided it was time for a long overdue restructuring of the business.  This will be a long process and focused on creating business alongside the team, rather than wait for it. 

restructuring the work

Something I have advocated for many years is independent TV and film which is the direction I plan to take the business.  Creating videos and content around the behind the scenes part of my work whilst creating something new, more about showcasing my own work and skill set.  We seem to have lost direction in certain areas of the makeup artist craft.  

While I appreciate that there are tiers to any business it can depend on your location how this affects and molds your business.  For me, its time to move on and find a new avenue that will allow my business to thrive in the field I prefer.  

Ultimately I want to step away from the current oversaturated market and denigrated service industry and showcase something more solid showcasing how I have worked for years and that my job is more than just social media looks and party time. 

The focus of the job will change and I will be working on the behind the scenes elements and bringing content to the table that will be solid rather than just about clicks, it's about the skills.  Brand support will be elemental to this but in a more solid way focused rather than the scattergun approach, this will be aimed at actual working practice rather than just a sales pitch from the highest bidder.  

My team will be small and focused on the creation of commercial projects in a set theme and continue forward with this under a new banner.