Reaching for the Stars and how its Done

When you are working as a makeup artist, especially someone aspiring to work in film and TV. There needs to be a degree of give and take in the process. Experience will get you through and into better projects over the course of time. Understanding how business works, especially the film business, can mean the difference between securing the gig and being replaced.

Reaching for the stars

Stories leak all the time about people securing gigs on a lie, by that I mean telling the production team they can do something and then failing to provide the service offered.

When it comes to reaching for the stars sometimes you need to build a ladder to get there.

Remember networking is a must and being an assistant is not something to be sniffed at. You can gain a huge amount by assisting a senior artist.

For me its all about knowing my skill set and market audience. My journey is slightly different and I do have plans, goals and aspirations that may not suit everyone and thats OK, but heres a general sense of how to move up the ladder and earn your craft.

  • When you first graduate, remember you won’t get into large scale projects immediately you will need to build your CV and show that you are willing to put the time into getting there.

  • Nothing happens overnight. Contact artists be open to assisting and listen to them.

  • Don’t listen to rumours. Just because the person teaching you doesn’t like another artist does not mean that their opinion is accurate. No platforming someone based on rumours will end badly for you.

  • Low budget is not necessarily a bad thing. Every job should have a contract, talk to the people behind the film and be open to the options.

*From a recent chat with a director, “we contacted several artists before we spoke to you and the responses were weird. Two didn’t answer, one wished us good luck but wouldn’t work for free. She didn’t ask if we had a budget what the pay scale was she just dismissed it.”

When you work for a company you can be there anywhere up to a month (I have even see it be two or three) before you get paid, so why do you think that immediately dropping an offer is smart, ask questions and negotiate.

Know your own limits, if you can’t do it, don’t sell it.

Start small and build, a website is a must. You can tie it to your social media and other accounts and use it as a marketing tool that will benefit you long term.

Above all else, be open to the possibilities and treat it like the business you claim it is.