The Realities of Beauty Writing and being a Makeup Artist

When it comes to being a beauty editor or a beauty writer there is a sense of ease that is taken for granted in the process. People will undermine the work and treat it like a whimsical process that relies on words like confection and decadence to support its own validity.

Beauty writing

This also leads to people undermining the work and in some cases using the piece as their own platform to boost their own (ego) or business. Without giving any thought or credit to the person writing. Removing the platform that they use to promote themselves and demanding fair treatment when they refuse to do the same.

Invalidating someone else’s work has become somewhat commonplace, the notion that anyone in the same field as you, even in the broadest sense, is competition and ergo should be removed from the marketplace is a sad and frankly an unnecessary action.

As a beauty editor and writer my days can be spent on the computer writing, researching or arranging meetings. On odd occasions I have been known to shoot my own work, although that in and of itself is becoming rare as the platform seems to be wasted when bookings are going to fresher talent “to give them a chance” with the expectation that I promote them and/or a project that I have spent time designing for is no longer mine it has been given to someone else to “allow their business to grow.” After all I am established and known so its OK to use my network to promote someone else.

Now I am not saying that I won’t support but I also will not accept that all work must be done with freshers, that is ridiculous and negates years of training and hard work.

It has become common to Demand and demean the work to a point where I have had to tell clients I am no longer willing to work with or give voice to certain people and brands because of the sheer arrogance and egotism of their behaviour toward me and my work.

Being a beauty editor or a makeup artist has a degree of diplomacy involved and lately that has become a difficult skill to offer at least thats what I am told when I refuse to cow tow to demands that are both unreasonable and outright nasty.

It is taken for granted that money is not the objective of the work when dealing with outside parties (usually I am asked to work free because reasons) and then asked to pay for copies of said images/film.

As a beauty writer/editor and makeup artist, I have had to change my terms of service to accommodate a glut of badly managed artists who feel entitled to press.

If you are approaching the table come with some degree of humility, come with a plan and be open to negotiations otherwise you will not make it past hello.